Gustave a REAL crocodile Legend…

GUSTAVE THE REAL CROCS LEGEND
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5cnvkHYqLg
For 20 years, near Lake Tanganyika in Burundi, locals have been terrorized by one of the largest freshwater crocodiles in the world. The 25 foot long crocodile, named Gustave, has an insatiable appetite… for people. He is known for having eaten over 200 people, though some believe that number to be as high as 300. In the past, all attempts to catch or kill Gustave were unsuccessful. Still, for one man who has made it his mission to hunt the crocodile, there may be a more humane solution to stopping this man-eater. Patrice Faye is Frenchman, but he’s been living in Burundi for the past two decades. He became something of a local hero 11 years ago when he made his first attempts to capture Gustave using a trap, but that didn’t work out well. “He must have a very strong survival instinct , because he has survived while other crocodiles were massacred,” Faye told the BBC Brasil.
Despite the fact that Gustave has eaten so many people, Faye still has respect for his elusive nemesis–and does not intend on killing him. We live in an age where creatures like these are increasingly rare. He’s a prehistoric animal, very fat. In the water, he’s like a hippo. But he still has all his teeth, suggesting that he is about 68 years.
During one three month period that he followed the crocodile, 17 people were eaten. This had lead Faye to estimate that Gustave has probably eaten over 300 in the last 20 years. “I do not think it is a matter of taste, but a question of what he can hunt,” he said. Faye points out that Gustave’s massive size likely makes acquiring more conventional meals difficult–plus a diet of fish probably wouldn’t be enough to satisfy his appetite. Faye says the crocodile “has no choice but to hunt easier prey,” and humans in or around the lake are good candidates.
So, what’s the best way to humanely deal with a man-eating crocodile? Faye hopes that following Gustave’s movements more closely might reduce the numbers of people being eaten. I have informants. In Burundi, thousands of people who live along the lake, especially fishermen who spend most of their time in water. I gave them a dozen cell phones to tell me where he is. Still, some gun-wielding locals have made attempts to stop Gustave themselves. “Many fishermen said they had hit him. He seems to have bullet proof leather.”
It may take more than a bullet to stop an enormous, man-eating crocodile–or to discourage his devoted follower Patrice Faye.
gustave.jpg

Advertisements

The war against Ivory Trade, continues as Uganda seizes an estimated 1.5 tons of ivory products.

LUXURY TRAVEL IN EAST AFRICA

The war against ivory continues

Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) and Uganda Police Friday raided a palatial home in the suburbs of the capital and arrested three men believed to be dealers in the illegal ivory trade. The law enforcement agents, who were acting on a tip from the Natural Resources Conservation Network, a local non-governmental organization, also seized an estimated 1.5 tons of ivory products during the Friday evening raid.

The two suspects, confirmed to be natives of Guinea Bissau, and one from Liberia will be charged with illegal possession of ivory.

“Thanks to concerted efforts by the government, the elephant population is on the rise in Uganda. But this country continues to be a major ivory trafficking conduit, and we are seeing with this latest incident just how much the illicit ivory trade continues to wreak havoc on the continent—on African wildlife and security in particular,” said Kaddu…

View original post 367 more words

The war against Ivory Trade, continues as Uganda seizes an estimated 1.5 tons of ivory products.

The war against ivory continues

Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) and Uganda Police Friday raided a palatial home in the suburbs of the capital and arrested three men believed to be dealers in the illegal ivory trade. The law enforcement agents, who were acting on a tip from the Natural Resources Conservation Network, a local non-governmental organization, also seized an estimated 1.5 tons of ivory products during the Friday evening raid.

The two suspects, confirmed to be natives of Guinea Bissau, and one from Liberia will be charged with illegal possession of ivory.

“Thanks to concerted efforts by the government, the elephant population is on the rise in Uganda. But this country continues to be a major ivory trafficking conduit, and we are seeing with this latest incident just how much the illicit ivory trade continues to wreak havoc on the continent—on African wildlife and security in particular,” said Kaddu Sebunya, president of African Wildlife Foundation (AWF).

The seized ivory was transferred to UWA pending presentation at the court as evidence. As of this morning, the marking, counting and weighing of the ivory was still ongoing to ascertain the exact total volumes, which took three vans to transport.

The ivory seizure comes in the wake of continued and sustained engagements between African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) and UWA to strengthen security at the country’s key border points. As a key partner for UWA, AWF last year helped establish Uganda’s-first-ever wildlife detection dog program. Through its Canines for Conservation Program, AWF trained four dogs and 12 UWA handlers. The detection dog units have since been deployed to Entebbe International Airport in Kampala, Uganda, where in a single month they made 21 busts.

AWF and UWA recently placed a request to State House for unlimited access of ivory sniffer dogs to Uganda’s points of entry and exit especially airports. There has been overwhelming response and it is expected that Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni will officially launch the Canines for Conservation program on March 3 during World Wildlife Day celebrations.

AWF’s Sebunya observed, “The use of detection dogs through AWF’s Canines for Conservation program adds a critical layer of security that assists our wildlife authority partners in their difficult fight against wildlife trafficking.”

Patrick J. Bergin, CEO of African Wildlife Foundation, added that stopping Africa’s natural heritage from being stolen off the continent requires global cooperation and political will to shut down the harmful trade. “Illegal wildlife trafficking is such a monumental problem that it cannot be resolved by one country alone. We hope this event highlights the continued need for governments around the world to do their share to ultimately save these iconic species—not just in Africa but also in Europe, United States and around the world. ” he said.

Some of the documentation found with the seized ivory indicated that the contraband was en route to Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. A recent report by TRAFFIC titled Malaysia’s invisible ivory channel: An assessment of ivory seizures involving Malaysia from January 2003- May 2014 points to Malaysia as the world’s paramount ivory transit country.

 The above news were reported by AWF